Ghostly October Apparition

As I was writing just a few days ago, I quite like LEGO‘s new Hidden Side series (minus the interactive features, of course), so I was wondering whether it would at least get some special issues in magazine form. Lo and behold, it looks like it’s even going to get a regular bi-monthly publishing cycle for the next two years at least. So let’s see what the first issue has in store.

LEGO Magazine, Hidden Side, October 2019, Cover

First, let me be clear about one thing: While the main protagonists are supposed in their early teenage years, i.e. early puberty, I don’t think the magazines will do anything for this target demographic or appeal to them specifically. To me this whole concept seems like some people in their mid-forties decided to be zeitgeist-y and in a corporate meeting came up with something that they think younger people might consider hip. It always feels a bit embarrassing and ingratiating.

Why is this important? Well of course the magazine can’t stay away from giving everyone a short biography. I’d rather they would not and left it open to everyone’s imagination what specific age the figures are. It’s already bad enough that they all are explicitly named. You know, LEGO are always beating about the bush on fostering creativity like e.g. with this week’s launch of their Rebuild the World campaign, but at the end of they day they way too often try to lock people into specific play scenarios. Arguably, with this being also being tied into their digital games some of that is inevitable, but it still rubs me the wrong way.

With all that said, the magazine isn’t half bad. It comes with a version of the Jack Davids figure that also is included in pretty much almost every single one of the buyable sets. I couldn’t say that I needed the umpteenth iteration to stash away in my boxes, but if e.g. you only got the Newbury Juice Bar (40336) as a freebie while buying other stuff at the LEGO store, this is a good complementary figure to get you started. The rest of the magazine follows very much the same pattern familiar from the Star Wars and City versions.

The comic is drawn nicely, but not least of all due to that odd age thing doesn’t quite click with me. But perhaps I’m really getting too old and stay away from all this new-fangled social media stuff too much. The poster has the artworks of the commercial sets all munched together on one side and while this provides a clearer look at some of the pieces, I still wish they’d tackle this one at a time. It seems a bit of a waste to come up with the designs and then print them so barely recognizable over and over again.

Overall it’s okay for a first issue, though I hope they will amp it up quite a bit in future mags. The next one due in November is going to include the pizza shirt dude from the Shrimp Shack Attack (70422) set with an alternate “possessed” head and hair piece, so that’s at least a tiny step up already. In the long run I would like to see something a bit more exclusive, however.